Stimulus Funds – Bellow In Gark http://bellowingark.org/ Fri, 04 Jun 2021 22:13:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://bellowingark.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default1.png Stimulus Funds – Bellow In Gark http://bellowingark.org/ 32 32 Mills submits plan to legislature to spend $ 1 billion in federal stimulus assistance https://bellowingark.org/mills-submits-plan-to-legislature-to-spend-1-billion-in-federal-stimulus-assistance/ https://bellowingark.org/mills-submits-plan-to-legislature-to-spend-1-billion-in-federal-stimulus-assistance/#respond Fri, 04 Jun 2021 21:21:17 +0000 https://bellowingark.org/mills-submits-plan-to-legislature-to-spend-1-billion-in-federal-stimulus-assistance/ The Mills administration on Friday submitted its proposal to spend nearly $ 1 billion in federal stimulus dollars in the legislature, setting in motion what should be a rushed review of the massive spending plan announced by Governor Janet Mills a month ago. Maine is expected to receive about $ 4.5 billion from the $ […]]]>


The Mills administration on Friday submitted its proposal to spend nearly $ 1 billion in federal stimulus dollars in the legislature, setting in motion what should be a rushed review of the massive spending plan announced by Governor Janet Mills a month ago.

Maine is expected to receive about $ 4.5 billion from the $ 1.9 trillion US bailout package passed by Congress according to parties in March as a way to boost the economy amid the COVID-19 pandemic. About $ 3.5 billion of that total will go towards pandemic response, unemployment benefits, stimulus payments to individuals, relief payments to businesses or city and county governments.

Mills proposed to split the state government’s share of $ 997.5 million among three target areas: $ 258.4 million for short-term economic stimulus programs, $ 294.5 million for initiatives long-term economic benefits and $ 418 million for infrastructure improvements.

The funding would be used for everything from economic stimulus grants for businesses to hundreds of millions of dollars for broadband expansion, energy efficiency upgrades and capital improvements in state parks. , hatcheries and state-run wastewater treatment plants.

“It is an impressive responsibility to figure out how to use these time-bound funds in a way that spurs economic growth in the short and long term, in a way that will benefit everyone in Maine,” Kirsten Figueroa, Commissioner of the department. administrative and financial services, told the Committee on Credit and Financial Affairs. “The administration has created this roadmap which is in line with the intentions of Congress when it passed this transformative legislation to enable states to move their economies forward through and beyond the throes of the pandemic.”

Mills unveiled much of the plan on May 4, but the details submitted to legislators this week have been refined based on guidance from the US Treasury, Figueroa said. Most of the spending was intended to be pilot projects or one-time investments to avoid ongoing spending obligations based, in large part, on recommendations from a state economic stimulus committee and an economic development plan. over 10 years.

Friday’s meeting was the Budget Drafting Committee’s first presentation on the nearly $ 1 billion plan and comes less than two weeks before the legislature rises.

The dozens of initiatives contained in the plan include:

• $ 21 million to expand broadband Internet access, to which will be added $ 129 million in additional federal funds for broadband infrastructure;

• $ 80 million in grants and loans to businesses still struggling with the pandemic;

• $ 105 million for vocational and technical education, manpower programs and higher education initiatives;

• $ 50 million to support Maine’s three “heritage industries” of fishing, agriculture and forestry;

• $ 80 million to replenish the state unemployment trust fund and avoid a potential 60% increase in corporate unemployment taxes due to pandemic-related spending;

• $ 5 million for a “remote worker welcome program” to retain people who moved to Maine during the pandemic and attract more remote workers;

• $ 50 million to repair roads and bridges;

• $ 50 million to upgrade buildings, roads, shelters and other infrastructure in Maine State Parks.

Figueroa noted that $ 22 million of the total will go to the administration, monitoring and reporting required by the federal government.

Lawmakers on the budget drafting committee face an extreme lack of time to review the plan as well as a mid-budget package of changes submitted by the Mills administration. The legislature is expected to adjourn by June 16, and every day of the next week is occupied by sessions of the House and Senate, leaving the committee with little uninterrupted time to consider the billion dollar spending plan. .

No public hearing was scheduled for the bill on Friday, LD 1733.

“We’re trying to figure this out, but we don’t have a firm public hearing date on the calendar yet,” said Senator Cathy Breen, D-Falmouth, co-chair of the committee.

Several committee members expressed concerns about the late timing of the stimulus spending plan.

Representative Sawin Millett, R-Waterford, also asked if Figueroa or other heads of state agencies were concerned about the ability to handle the sudden addition or expansion of so many programs. A former finance and DAFS commissioner, Millett likened the situation to “changing the tires on the plane while they fly it”.

Figueroa responded that after 16 months of navigating a pandemic, state officials have grown accustomed to “flying while building.”

“We are up to the challenge and have considerations for the amount of work, but we are also excited and ready for the impact, improvements and transformation that will occur as a result of all of the activities we have talked about,” said Figueroa. “There are long-standing issues that people who worked in state government … have talked about for years and there are opportunities here now.”


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Newark school district to get massive injection of $ 177 million in federal stimulus funds https://bellowingark.org/newark-school-district-to-get-massive-injection-of-177-million-in-federal-stimulus-funds/ https://bellowingark.org/newark-school-district-to-get-massive-injection-of-177-million-in-federal-stimulus-funds/#respond Thu, 03 Jun 2021 23:59:37 +0000 https://bellowingark.org/newark-school-district-to-get-massive-injection-of-177-million-in-federal-stimulus-funds/ June 03, 2021 Newark school district set to receive $ 177 million in federal stimulus funds, says figures published Monday – a historic windfall that has the potential to reshape New Jersey’s largest school system for years to come. When combined with the $ 84 million in pandemic relief funds already allocated to Newark schools, […]]]>


June 03, 2021

Newark school district set to receive $ 177 million in federal stimulus funds, says figures published Monday – a historic windfall that has the potential to reshape New Jersey’s largest school system for years to come.

When combined with the $ 84 million in pandemic relief funds already allocated to Newark schools, the district owes about $ 262 million in new federal aid, or nearly $ 7,300 more per student. Funding is equivalent to about 25% of the total district budget, but unlike other income which must cover salaries and other fixed costs, the district has a great deal of latitude in how it can spend relief money.

The massive influx of funding could fuel radical change. Ten years ago, a $ 200 million injection from private donors, including Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, funded an overhaul of Newark’s school system – including school closures, new charter schools, and a revamped teachers’ contract – which keep ringing today. This private money pool was 30% smaller than the funding wave now heading to Newark.

“We are delighted to receive much needed funds to help and support students, staff and families in our district,” Superintendent Roger León said in a statement. “And after the year we’ve all had, the timing is perfect and they deserve no less.”

The latest round of relief money is part of the massive stimulus package approved by Congress earlier this year, which included nearly $ 130 billion for K-12 education. Very poor districts receive a larger share of aid, which is why Newark’s per student amount is about double the national average.

Fair two years ago, the Newark School District had to cut positions and postpone building repairs in order to balance its budget. Now, incredibly, he’s on the verge of coming out of the pandemic with cash. In addition to the new federal aid, the district also obtained a 10% increase in state funding for the next school year.

Local authorities have a lot of freedom in how they spend federal money. It can go into technology, mental health services, some building repairs, services for English learners and students with disabilities, and hiring new employees, among other uses.

Districts must spend at least 20% of their allocation, or about $ 35.5 million in Newark’s case, to meet loss of student learning caused by the pandemic. Possible strategies suggested by the stimulus bill include summer learning, after-school programs and longer school days or years.

While cash-strapped schools are sure to welcome federal aid, it comes with big limits, said Bruce Baker, a school finance expert at Rutgers University.

Districts only have until October 2024, just over three years, to spend the stimulus money. If schools are spending it on recurring expenses, such as salaries for employees or tutors, they will have to find some other way to cover those costs – or get rid of them – when the aid money runs out, a. Baker said.

One of the best uses of the money is to improve buildings, such as new heating and cooling systems, which will last beyond three years and could end up lowering utility costs, he said. he adds. Other uses, such as reducing the size of classrooms, could face constraints of space or personnel.

“It’s good, it’s necessary, it’s going to stop some bleeding,” Baker said of the stimulus money. “But I’m not convinced this is a game-changer unless the federal money continues to flow and the state gets to the point of fully funding” schools.

Newark’s bounty comes from a $ 2.76 billion pot of stimulus money set aside for New Jersey schools. While 90% of aid is to go to districts, the state will keep $ 276 million.

The New Jersey Department of Education recently released a draft expenditure plan. The plan includes technical assistance to help schools tackle learning loss, grants for summer and after-school programs, and expert teams to provide districts with coaching and training.

One of the conditions for assistance is that districts must develop plans to bring students back to classrooms. The public should be given the opportunity to comment on the “safe return” plans, which are expected on June 24.

Newark’s charter schools will also get a big boost from the relaunch. For example, the North Star Academy, which has 14 campuses in Newark, will receive $ 30 million. KIPP, with 11 Newark schools, owes about $ 25 million.


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How to influence how St. Louis spends millions of federal stimulus money – FOX 2 https://bellowingark.org/how-to-influence-how-st-louis-spends-millions-of-federal-stimulus-money-fox-2/ https://bellowingark.org/how-to-influence-how-st-louis-spends-millions-of-federal-stimulus-money-fox-2/#respond Thu, 03 Jun 2021 02:45:44 +0000 https://bellowingark.org/how-to-influence-how-st-louis-spends-millions-of-federal-stimulus-money-fox-2/ Missouri Supreme Court returns $ 113.7 million correctional officer judgment to lower courts Local News / 1 hour ago Video Sheriff investigating death of 32-year-old mother of two found hanged in prison shower Local News / 1 day ago Video Alton Police Chief addresses January incident where officers were filmed at a man’s home Local […]]]>


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Parties disagree on the meaning of federal funding for schools https://bellowingark.org/parties-disagree-on-the-meaning-of-federal-funding-for-schools/ https://bellowingark.org/parties-disagree-on-the-meaning-of-federal-funding-for-schools/#respond Wed, 02 Jun 2021 07:35:28 +0000 https://bellowingark.org/parties-disagree-on-the-meaning-of-federal-funding-for-schools/ 6/1/2021 PAWTUCKET – As local school officials pressure city leaders to return $ 500,000 to local education after voting in May to remove it, the Rhode Island League of Cities and Towns argues that Pawtucket and other communities should receive even less financial assistance than they do. ‘currently obtain. As during the Great Recession, the […]]]>


6/1/2021

PAWTUCKET – As local school officials pressure city leaders to return $ 500,000 to local education after voting in May to remove it, the Rhode Island League of Cities and Towns argues that Pawtucket and other communities should receive even less financial assistance than they do. ‘currently obtain.

As during the Great Recession, the league is asking the General Assembly to authorize a temporary 5% reduction in local education aid, or the total amount under the “sustain the effort” requirements that communities fund at least as much as they did the previous year, citing the reason that districts such as Pawtucket should receive as much federal funding.

But local school officials reject that notion, saying they need local funds, and federal funds must be used very specifically, almost like grants, and cannot be used for typical departmental operations.

League chief executive Brian Daniels, who testified before the General Assembly last week, told The Breeze that many city officials fear that additional hires and new programs brought in by the stimulus funds could lead to a new enduring burden, claiming that these one-time dollars should only be used for one-time expenses.

Many school districts have had large surpluses this year, he said, which further explains the fact that with $ 500 million in additional funds going to these districts, those dollars should be used to replace the funds. premises on items such as upgrading local schools. facilities.

The problem right now, he said, is that the Rhode Island Department of Education has yet to distribute the federal money or say definitively what it can be used for, which means that districts cannot yet access them even as communities finalize budgets and school. districts demand more money from local taxpayers.

It could be argued that community leaders might just say no to continuing to fund new employees or programs once the federal funding runs out in a year or two, Daniels said, but what happens when is there not enough attrition in the employment ranks and residents are starting to put pressure on officials at public meetings to maintain staffing levels? RIDE needs to give districts more advice so that they don’t create long-term obligations with the money, he said.

According to his estimates, schools in Pawtucket should receive more than $ 40 million in federal funds, Daniels said, with some likely lost to the state, clawing them back for other needs and for charter schools, and so on. is “a ton of money” coming to a district that demands an additional $ 500,000 from local taxpayers.

Some 20 percent of the $ 375 million allocated to districts in the last round of funding is needed to go to programs such as summer sessions that address student learning loss, he said. , so the League of Cities and Towns advocates using this money for some of the initiatives for which school officials are asking for local funding.

The majority of the additional $ 500,000 requested by Pawtucket schools from the city is aimed at strengthening social / emotional supports within the district in response to the impacts of the pandemic.

Erin Dube, president-elect of the Rhode Island Association of School Committees and vice-chair of the Pawtucket School Committee, said the $ 500,000 “is absolutely necessary.”

One of the key points emerging from state meetings last week was that none of the expenses covered by federal funds can be operational that districts have not been able to finance over the past three years, she said. declared. His interpretation is that districts cannot just hire someone and then fire them at a later date.

Dube has a letter to the editor on the issue of funding in this week’s edition of The Breeze.

Asked about other districts such as Cumberland suggesting they could use the funds to hire people and then allow the jobs to disappear, she said: “I don’t know if RIDE will approve of this.” Commissioner Angélica Infante-Green made it clear last week that districts can only hire staff if there is a plan in place to maintain the positions in the future, she noted.

“What we’ve tried to make clear is that if the districts want to hire staff, that’s fine, but they have to have a plan for when that money isn’t there,” Infante-Green said during the May 26 meeting.

State officials said at the May 26 meeting that they expected the councils to be back in the districts by June 7.

Dube said she was not there when the state funding formula went into effect, but the reality is that when the state started giving “a lot of money” to Pawtucket, town no. has not increased funding for about seven years, which has led Pawtucket to be “grossly underfunded” on the school side. The increase in public funds is not meant to be a chance for a community to stand up. withdraw from her education obligations, she said.

With a district limited to only asking for a 4 percent increase per year, and this increase not being granted for years, this leads to a situation of gross underfunding.


The Valley Breeze is committed to keeping quality news like this free for our readers. You can be a big part of this local journalism success story by making a one-time or monthly contribution to what we do every week. Thanks as always for reading.


Communities should really view this federal money as grants to be applied for specific purposes, she said, and not as a lump sum that will be deposited into Pawtucket’s bank account.

She noted that the city side of the budget also receives significant funding from the federal government, but more than two-thirds of all budget cuts have come from the schools side.

One of the proposed uses for Pawtucket’s federal funds includes transportation money to get students to additional sessions this summer, a one-time expense created solely because of the pandemic, Dube said.

The whole process remains quite muddy for everyone involved, she said, as there are a lot of questions at all levels about how the money can be used. It’s not like previous federal money linked to COVID-19, she said, as that money was directed towards items like filters or masks, things “easier to think of in practice.”



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What suburban colleges plan to do with the latest COVID-19 relief funds https://bellowingark.org/what-suburban-colleges-plan-to-do-with-the-latest-covid-19-relief-funds/ https://bellowingark.org/what-suburban-colleges-plan-to-do-with-the-latest-covid-19-relief-funds/#respond Tue, 01 Jun 2021 10:38:26 +0000 https://bellowingark.org/what-suburban-colleges-plan-to-do-with-the-latest-covid-19-relief-funds/ Suburban community colleges that are set to receive millions more in federal COVID-19 relief funding over the coming months are stepping up efforts to help needy students with tuition and other expenses, as well as to use the money to mitigate the impact of the pandemic on their budgets. The US bailout approved in March […]]]>


Suburban community colleges that are set to receive millions more in federal COVID-19 relief funding over the coming months are stepping up efforts to help needy students with tuition and other expenses, as well as to use the money to mitigate the impact of the pandemic on their budgets.

The US bailout approved in March provides more than $ 36 billion in emergency grants, including $ 10 billion to community colleges, $ 2.6 billion to historically black colleges and universities, and $ 6 billion to Hispanic institutions and other institutions serving minorities. Illinois’ share is about $ 1.26 billion.

Public and private colleges and universities can use the funds to support students with exceptional needs, including unforeseen expenses, such as job loss, food or housing insecurity and transportation, to provide academic supports or health, pay off debt and mitigate the spread of COVID. 19.

Several suburban colleges are stepping up efforts to provide funds to students who need it most. Unlike previous rounds of stimulus funding, this latest grant can be used to provide emergency assistance to international students and students in Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA or Dreamers).

“We are opening emergency scholarships to all students, regardless of their citizenship or immigration status,” said Kim Pohl, spokesperson for Harper College in Palatine.

Harper will receive $ 22.3 million in this third round of pandemic relief funding.

As part of the first round of stimulus, Harper received $ 5.5 million, of which approximately $ 3.4 million was distributed in grants to approximately 5,200 students. The college received $ 12.6 million in the second stimulus allowance. At each turn, officials commit more money than necessary for direct student aid.

“We recognize that students continue to face significant hardship due to COVID-19 and we are committed to providing financial relief so they can stay on track,” Pohl said. “We plan to distribute $ 7.5 million directly to students.”

So far this spring, Harper has provided $ 2.6 million to approximately 3,300 students, and officials have reached out to 3,800 other students with exceptional needs.

“We take into account considerations including being low income, first generation, being a student of color, having a disability, being part of the women’s program… we wanted to streamline the process. better than we could for the students, “said Pohl.” Having a formal application process can be a barrier. “

College of Lake County in Grayslake will receive $ 20.5 million in ARP funds.

The college received more than $ 4.9 million and $ 11.5 million, respectively, in the first and second rounds of stimulus funding. It has distributed over $ 8.6 million in emergency student grants and disbursements will continue into the summer and fall.

“Applications always come in regularly,” said Karen Hlavin, CTC vice president of student development.

The College of DuPage at Glen Ellyn will receive approximately $ 36 million in this latest round of stimulus funding, of which $ 18.5 million will go to help students with tuition fees, college president Brian Caputo said.

The college received $ 9.1 million from the first COVID relief program, of which $ 4.5 million went to students. Half of the second stimulus tranche of $ 20.6 million will also be allocated in direct aid to students in the coming weeks.

The remaining funds will be used to offset college expenses incurred as a result of the pandemic, including lost income, technology costs, such as laptops and hotspots to loan to students, and to purchase security products. , such as personal protective equipment, hand sanitizers and masks, spokeswoman Jennifer Duda said.

Elgin Community College’s share in the latest stimulus funding bill is $ 17.5 million, of which 50% is earmarked for students.

During the first two funding rounds, ECC received $ 4.9 million and $ 10.4 million, respectively, and provided $ 4.4 million in direct aid to approximately 5,000 students.

To date, $ 2 million has been distributed to 2,071 students this spring term, said Kim Wagner, ECC vice president of business and finance.

Officials have seen demands decrease and are redoubling their efforts to get more students to take advantage of the free money. Relief funds do not have to be repaid and many students might not realize they are entitled to them, Wagner said.

“It’s an awareness issue,” Wagner said. “There’s just a lot of misunderstanding. We’ve got $ 1 million waiting to help them and we’ll have a lot more (coming) around the corner.”



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New payment could reach LESS Americans as income cap could be lowered https://bellowingark.org/new-payment-could-reach-less-americans-as-income-cap-could-be-lowered/ https://bellowingark.org/new-payment-could-reach-less-americans-as-income-cap-could-be-lowered/#respond Mon, 31 May 2021 17:10:00 +0000 https://bellowingark.org/new-payment-could-reach-less-americans-as-income-cap-could-be-lowered/ If a fourth stimulus check payment were to be approved by Congress, federal aid could be sent to far fewer Americas than before, experts warn. More than 80 Democratic lawmakers are asking for additional stimulus funds, but so far President Joe Biden has not announced any plans for a fourth round of payments. Read our […]]]>


If a fourth stimulus check payment were to be approved by Congress, federal aid could be sent to far fewer Americas than before, experts warn.

More than 80 Democratic lawmakers are asking for additional stimulus funds, but so far President Joe Biden has not announced any plans for a fourth round of payments.

Read our live blog on Stimulus Controls for the latest updates on relief from Covid-19 …

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A new round of stimulus payments, if approved, would likely be sent to far fewer Americans than before.Credit: Getty
More than 80 lawmakers have asked Biden to make additional payments

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More than 80 lawmakers have asked Biden to make additional paymentsCredit: AP

But if a payment similar to checks for $ 1,400 as part of its US bailout is approved, experts recommend that the government focus only on the poorest Americans.

“If Congress wanted to further reduce poverty or provide additional resources more broadly, the additional payments could do so,” said a Tax Policy Center report.

“We modeled two options for additional payments of $ 1,400. One of them would start to disappear at lower income levels, which is what we call the faster move bonus.

“This payment would provide targeted assistance to people with slightly lower incomes and would include everyone, rather than just citizens.”

As part of the plan, experts say the funds would be phased out, meaning Americans would receive different payments based on their income.

This policy was used as part of Biden’s $ 1.9 trillion US bailout.

However, if a fourth check were approved, the eligibility limit would likely be below the $ 75,000 threshold of the last round.

The poorest Americans would likely be targeted

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The poorest Americans would likely be targetedCredit: Getty

“The other payment option we modeled would replicate ARP payment thresholds and limit citizen eligibility,” the Tax Policy Center report said.

“As long as payments start to be phased out above the poverty line, they will have a strong anti-poverty effect.”

Analysis by the Urban Institute (UI) also highlights how African American and Latin American communities would be the biggest benefactors of another round of federal aid.

“We estimate that a single additional payment could reduce poverty in 2021 from 13.7% to between 6.4 and 6.6%, depending on whether the payment is accessible to everyone in the United States or limited to citizens,” writes the group.

This payment would help lift 6.6 million people out of poverty, according to the group’s plans.

If a fifth round was also approved, UI said poverty could be reduced at rates between 4.9% and 5.2%, depending on the eligibility factors for that payment.

So far, it appears Biden has no intention of approving any further stimulus payments as he seeks to reduce poverty with his infrastructure and family plans.

However, the chorus of voices calling for additional direct payments continues to grow.

So far, it looks like Biden has no plans to approve new stimulus payments.

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So far, it looks like Biden has no plans to approve new stimulus payments.Credit: CNP

Almost 2.25 million people have now signed a online petition launched by an unemployed restaurant owner in Denver, calling for new stimulus checks of $ 2,000 for adults and $ 1,000 for children.

These would be followed by regular checks throughout the duration of the pandemic.

More than 80 members of Congress have signed letters urging President Biden to support recurring payments until the pandemic is over.

And while many Americans would undoubtedly benefit from additional financial support, the evidence suggests that the worst days of the pandemic are behind us – rendering another round of checks unnecessary.

Last week, the government confirmed that the U.S. economy grew at a high annual rate of 6.4% in January, February and March.

While unemployment remains high, with nearly 10 million unemployed, new jobless claims recently hit their lowest level since the start of the COVID crisis.

Biden’s party also controls Congress with very narrow margins, meaning any legislation would prove difficult to pass.

Republicans and even some moderate Democrats have been extremely critical of Biden’s spending plans, especially after he unveiled a $ 6 trillion spending plan for next year on Friday.

Expert steps in on fourth stimulus test as Biden fails to commit



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How to make sure you receive the next payment https://bellowingark.org/how-to-make-sure-you-receive-the-next-payment/ https://bellowingark.org/how-to-make-sure-you-receive-the-next-payment/#respond Sat, 29 May 2021 21:56:00 +0000 https://bellowingark.org/how-to-make-sure-you-receive-the-next-payment/ While there does not appear to be a fourth test raise on the horizon, the American rescue plan includes more relief that could help millions of U.S. homeowners who struggled during the coronavirus pandemic. The package, signed by President Joe Biden in March, includes a low-profile program called the Homeowners Assistance Fund. Unlike the $ […]]]>


While there does not appear to be a fourth test raise on the horizon, the American rescue plan includes more relief that could help millions of U.S. homeowners who struggled during the coronavirus pandemic. The package, signed by President Joe Biden in March, includes a low-profile program called the Homeowners Assistance Fund. Unlike the $ 1,400 stimulus check that was automatically sent to qualifying US taxpayers, this relief requires homeowners to apply.

The American Rescue Plan has set aside $ 10 billion for the Homeowners Assistance Fund. It is meant to help homeowners pay off their mortgage, but can also be used to pay for taxes, insurance, utilities, and other expenses that homeowners face, note Forbes. The US Treasury is currently sending the funds to the states, and the funds will be distributed through state housing agencies. The amount of aid sent to each state is based on several thresholds, including unemployment levels, foreclosures and the number of late mortgage payments.

Although aid may vary from state to state, each will receive at least $ 50 million for the program, according to a Treasury Department file. A minimum of $ 50 million has also been set aside for the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. An amount of $ 30 million is also earmarked for Guam, American Samoa, the United States Virgin Islands and the Northern Mariana Islands. The fund also includes an “explicit mandate to prioritize socially disadvantaged households”. States have until September 30, 2025 to spend mortgage relief. Owners can contact their national housing agency to find out how they plan to distribute the aid and how homeowners can receive it.

There are also several qualifications that an owner must meet to receive assistance. You must own your own home and have a mortgage. The mortgage balance in 2012 must be less than $ 584,250. The relief adds to the federal moratorium on mortgage foreclosures, which is still in effect until the end of June.

The cost of the American Rescue Plan was $ 1.9 trillion, so the Homeowners Assistance Fund and the Stimulus Check were just two of the programs funded. The law also broadened the federal child tax credit, so families can receive up to $ 3,600 per child. Another obscure program is the State and local government budget recovery fund, WKRC reports. This fund allocates $ 350 billion to state, local, territorial and tribal governments to help them cope with rising costs during the pandemic. Each state will receive a minimum of $ 500 million, and $ 20 billion has been set aside for tribal governments and $ 4.5 billion for US territories. The fund also set aside $ 130 billion for local governments. Members of local government can click here to use the Treasury website apply.



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Spokane Evaluates How To Use $ 84 Million In COVID-19 Stimulus Money https://bellowingark.org/spokane-evaluates-how-to-use-84-million-in-covid-19-stimulus-money/ https://bellowingark.org/spokane-evaluates-how-to-use-84-million-in-covid-19-stimulus-money/#respond Sat, 29 May 2021 00:37:20 +0000 https://bellowingark.org/spokane-evaluates-how-to-use-84-million-in-covid-19-stimulus-money/ Spokane city officials are considering how to spend $ 84 million in federal COVID-19 stimulus funds and, so far, have narrowed the strategy down to 4Rs. Replenish, reach out, resilience and relief. The four-pronged framework, set out in a motion for a city council resolution, is expected to guide the city’s decision-making process as it […]]]>


Spokane city officials are considering how to spend $ 84 million in federal COVID-19 stimulus funds and, so far, have narrowed the strategy down to 4Rs.

Replenish, reach out, resilience and relief.

The four-pronged framework, set out in a motion for a city council resolution, is expected to guide the city’s decision-making process as it decides how to spend its two allocations of more than $ 40 million from the US bailout.

City council discussed the resolution in a study session Thursday.

“This resolution is a first attempt to try to find a process to organize all the things people think it would be great to do,” said Council President Breean Beggs.

The resolution does not set aside funds for specific purposes.

Instead, it focuses on the four themes.

The city will aim to “replenish” its own coffers, especially to deal with revenues that have been hit by COVID-19.

An example would be Spokane Parks and Recreation, whose programming was disrupted by the pandemic last year.

Rather than just handing ministries a check, Beggs said the focus will be on developing “responsive” projects. In the case of the parks department, that means funding the aquatic program which was canceled entirely in 2020.

When schools closed during the pandemic, the city lost income normally captured by its cameras that force motorists through school zones at full speed. Scheduled for $ 2.6 million in fine revenue last year, the program had brought in just $ 1.2 million until November 2020.

The proceeds from these tickets go to projects to make roads safer. The concept within the framework of the resolution of the American rescue plan would not only be to replenish the lost revenue from traffic calming, but to support specific traffic calming projects.

“Reach out” refers to funding from community organizations that the city already funds, like Spokane COPS and Spokane Arts, which provide “near-urban services,” Beggs said.

By providing “relief,” Beggs said the city will seek to help businesses and residents in a way that alternative pandemic relief programs have not.

“Resilience,” according to the draft resolution, calls for “significant investments in forward-thinking initiatives that will create long-term sustainable growth and stability for the town of Spokane and all members of its community”.

To that end, Councilor Candace Mumm suggested piloting a two- or three-year pre-kindergarten program, funded by a combination of US bailout funds and other federal and state funds.

“There is data to support this; it has a huge economic and social impact on the road, ”Mumm said.

The board is expected to vote on the resolution on June 7.



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US Department of Education warns GOP budget puts $ 1.5 billion in federal education dollars at risk | Local government https://bellowingark.org/us-department-of-education-warns-gop-budget-puts-1-5-billion-in-federal-education-dollars-at-risk-local-government/ https://bellowingark.org/us-department-of-education-warns-gop-budget-puts-1-5-billion-in-federal-education-dollars-at-risk-local-government/#respond Fri, 28 May 2021 18:04:00 +0000 https://bellowingark.org/us-department-of-education-warns-gop-budget-puts-1-5-billion-in-federal-education-dollars-at-risk-local-government/ And now the US Department of Education, in a letter to the State Department of Education and Governor Tony Evers on Friday, said the $ 350 million allocated to the state budget stabilization fund , or “rainy day” funds, are unlikely to count. towards the minimum threshold unless they are devoted to K-12 education. “Specifically, […]]]>


And now the US Department of Education, in a letter to the State Department of Education and Governor Tony Evers on Friday, said the $ 350 million allocated to the state budget stabilization fund , or “rainy day” funds, are unlikely to count. towards the minimum threshold unless they are devoted to K-12 education.

“Specifically, Wisconsin may not view funds that lawmakers transfer to the Budget Stabilization Fund as state support for K-12 education until those funds are allocated.” by the legislature for the sole purpose of supporting K-12 education and made available. school districts for use in the applicable fiscal year, ”wrote Ian Rosenblum, Under-Secretary for Policy and Programs in the Office of Elementary and Secondary Education.

“Therefore, the $ 350 million that the state could transfer to the Fiscal Stabilization Fund cannot be considered as state support for education at the time of transfer, unless it is actually allocated. Kindergarten to Grade 12 education for the applicable fiscal year and not “for any other purpose”.

In addition, Rosenblum said the state is subject to minimum state support thresholds in order to qualify for funding from other federal education programs, including Title I, Part A of the Act. 1965 on primary and secondary education which provides financial assistance to educational agencies and schools. with high percentages of children from low-income families.



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Texas lawmakers finally pass two-year, $ 248.6 billion state budget, sent to Gov. Greg Abbott https://bellowingark.org/texas-lawmakers-finally-pass-two-year-248-6-billion-state-budget-sent-to-gov-greg-abbott/ https://bellowingark.org/texas-lawmakers-finally-pass-two-year-248-6-billion-state-budget-sent-to-gov-greg-abbott/#respond Thu, 27 May 2021 20:30:00 +0000 https://bellowingark.org/texas-lawmakers-finally-pass-two-year-248-6-billion-state-budget-sent-to-gov-greg-abbott/ This is a developing story. AUSTIN – The House, joining the Senate, on Thursday gave its final approval to a state budget of $ 248.6 billion over two years. The House action concluded work on a spending plan that lawmakers say delivers on its 2019 promises to better fund public schools, though critics have called […]]]>


This is a developing story.

AUSTIN – The House, joining the Senate, on Thursday gave its final approval to a state budget of $ 248.6 billion over two years.

The House action concluded work on a spending plan that lawmakers say delivers on its 2019 promises to better fund public schools, though critics have called it too loud for the needs of one. Fast growing state.

Including federal funds and investment income, the budget would spend about 5% less than the one Texas lives in – and which expires Aug.31.

Such a reduction “on paper” is very unusual. But the same was true last year, as COVID-19 and skyrocketing unemployment hit the Texas economy. Fears of a massive budget deficit increased last summer, then eased with the rebound in consumer spending by state residents.

In 2019, lawmakers passed a budget that also called for spending $ 248 billion in “all funds”. However, federal coronavirus aid funds that have flowed into Texas since then have increased spending in the current cycle to $ 262.1 billion – nearly $ 14 billion more than allowed in the next budget, Senate Bill 1.

The House sent SB 1 to Governor Greg Abbott, 142-6. Voted four Democrats, including Michelle Beckley of Carrollton and Jasmine Crockett of Dallas; and Republicans Jeff Cason of Bedford and Bryan Slaton of Royse City.

Members of the House also approved and sent Abbott a supplementary supply bill, House Bill 2.

This was after a 59-second explanation by the Chairman of the House Appropriations Committee, Greg Bonnen. The vote was 147-0.

Bonnen, R-Friendswood, called SB 1 a “conservative budget” which remains subject to various tax restrictions in the state constitution.

To maintain wiggle room under a constitutional ceiling, for example, House-Senate budget negotiators increased general spending in the current cycle by about $ 3 billion – adding $ 1 billion to a fund for relief from property tax and nearly a billion dollars for building. the pension fund of the employee pension system.

The increase in current spending creates an additional margin below the ceiling for spending in the next 2022-2023 cycle.

SB 1 is “a bill that all of us can be very proud of,” Bonnen said.

“It represents the priorities of Texans across the state.”

As Progressive Democrats say they are unhappy, lawmakers have resisted the expansion of Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act and angered by negotiators’ increased spending on state border security – at 1 .05 billion dollars – they are relieved to have a say in the disbursement of federal stimulus. money this fall.

Last-minute language ensured it won’t be spent unless lawmakers have a say, and Abbott has vowed to add the topic to a scheduled fall special session on redistribution.

House Democratic Caucus Chairman Chris Turner of Grand Prairie said that despite doubts the budget did not provide financial relief to Texans hit by the winter storm, but included $ 50 million for the centers pregnancy crisis, he would vote for because he is proud of this budget.

Turner and Bonnen trumpeted how the budget fully funds school improvements, teacher salary increases, and local school property tax cuts that lawmakers passed in 2019.

“We are keeping our commitment to our schools,” Bonnen said.

“The biggest victory … is for education,” said Turner, who praised members of the budget conference committee for finding an additional $ 380 million to cover higher education enrollment growth over the years. next two years.

As Senate Finance Committee Chair Jane Nelson led the package to senators’ unanimous approval on Wednesday, she recounted the dangers posed by the COVID-19 pandemic and economic recession.

“When I started working on this budget over a year ago, it was like someone took boxes of puzzles and threw them in the air and all the pieces fell, and we had to unravel it and put these puzzle pieces together, ”Nelson, R-Flower Mound recounted.

But state leaders forced agencies to cut spending and the economy rebounded, she said.

“Slowly but surely these pieces are fitting together,” Nelson said.



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